“There’s no question, I had some attitude about the way I wanted to be perceived,” said Chuck Close in discussing his Big Self-Portrait (1967–1968) in 1980. “Now it seems very funny wanting to look like this tough guy with a cigarette sticking out of the corner of my mouth and a big, aggressive image of myself and saying to the viewer, ‘Hey, notice my painting, notice me.’ … I think I was trying to find out who I was an artist.”

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walkerartcenter:

For 75 years, the Walker Art Center has been examining the questions that shape and inspire us as individuals, cultures, and communities. Questions like “what can art teach us?” and “when do you speak out?” and “what is your reality?” continue to shape and inspire us. 

Dive in to our history as a multidisciplinary art center and find out what it means to be a safe place for unsafe ideas: www.walkerart.org/75

“It’s a community of people who are — it sounds so corny — just dreaming,” says designer Erik Brandt of Ficciones Typografika, the international design poster show he’s been curating on his Minneapolis garage for the past 15 months. “People experimenting and doing something idiosyncratic, for no other reason than that they want to do it.” With no rules, no deadlines, and no pay, the project has become a vibrant playground for a range of design innovators from around the world, from legendary names (Ed Fella, Reza Abedini, Anthony Burrill) to new-generation innovators (Sang Mun, Felix Pfäffli, Janneke Meekes). Following up my interview with Brandt from last summer, here’s my new feature on it for Medium’s design site re:form.

“It’s a community of people who are — it sounds so corny — just dreaming,” says designer Erik Brandt of Ficciones Typografika, the international design poster show he’s been curating on his Minneapolis garage for the past 15 months. “People experimenting and doing something idiosyncratic, for no other reason than that they want to do it.” With no rules, no deadlines, and no pay, the project has become a vibrant playground for a range of design innovators from around the world, from legendary names (Ed Fella, Reza Abedini, Anthony Burrill) to new-generation innovators (Sang Mun, Felix Pfäffli, Janneke Meekes). Following up my interview with Brandt from last summer, here’s my new feature on it for Medium’s design site re:form.


  I don’t like the idea of giving voice to anyone. People have their own voice. Who the fuck am I to give voices to people? That’s very arrogant. I would just conceive it as this sculpture that has this potential in it, in which things can happen, and by placing it in a very specific way and a very specific moment, a very specific result may come out of it.


—Guillermo Calzadilla in “The Art of Response-ability: Allora & Calzadilla on Activism, Language, and Catalyzing Change”

I don’t like the idea of giving voice to anyone. People have their own voice. Who the fuck am I to give voices to people? That’s very arrogant. I would just conceive it as this sculpture that has this potential in it, in which things can happen, and by placing it in a very specific way and a very specific moment, a very specific result may come out of it.

—Guillermo Calzadilla in “The Art of Response-ability: Allora & Calzadilla on Activism, Language, and Catalyzing Change

Dread Scott writes an Artist Op-Ed on the killing of Michael Brown by Ferguson, Missouri, police:


  The only reason we are talking about the murder of Michael Brown today is because people stood up and stayed in the streets. In the face of increasing violence from various police forces, the only response is stepping up the struggle for justice. If you are the head of an empire and see that an unarmed youth is gunned down in cold blood by the police and your main advice is for people to be calm, your rule is illegitimate.

Dread Scott writes an Artist Op-Ed on the killing of Michael Brown by Ferguson, Missouri, police:

The only reason we are talking about the murder of Michael Brown today is because people stood up and stayed in the streets. In the face of increasing violence from various police forces, the only response is stepping up the struggle for justice. If you are the head of an empire and see that an unarmed youth is gunned down in cold blood by the police and your main advice is for people to be calm, your rule is illegitimate.

Artist James Bridle on terrorism, “deprivation” of citizenship,” and Hannah Arendt’s notion of the “right to have rights”:


  Citizenship is the right to have rights, and our attitude to citizenship, as states and individuals, defines and produces our attitude to other human beings. As we accelerate into the 21st century and the third millennium, citizenship, or the lack thereof, is going to be one of the defining issues. Look at the increasing ethnic and religious fractures of post-Imperial and post-Soviet nation-states, the coming age of sea-level rises and inevitable climate-change refugee crises, the rise of pan-global financial elites, and the increasing individual identification not with the nation-state but with digital space and corporate cloud-services. The cloud renders geography irrelevant—until you realize that everything that matters, everything that means you don’t die, is based not only on which passport you possess, but also on a complex web of definitions of what constitutes that passport. In the new battles over citizenship, those definitions are constantly under attack.


From "The Siege on Citizenship," the first installment in the Walker Art Center’s new series Artist Op-Eds. Next up: Metahaven, Liz Deschenes, Liam Gillick, others.

Artist James Bridle on terrorism, “deprivation” of citizenship,” and Hannah Arendt’s notion of the “right to have rights”:

Citizenship is the right to have rights, and our attitude to citizenship, as states and individuals, defines and produces our attitude to other human beings. As we accelerate into the 21st century and the third millennium, citizenship, or the lack thereof, is going to be one of the defining issues. Look at the increasing ethnic and religious fractures of post-Imperial and post-Soviet nation-states, the coming age of sea-level rises and inevitable climate-change refugee crises, the rise of pan-global financial elites, and the increasing individual identification not with the nation-state but with digital space and corporate cloud-services. The cloud renders geography irrelevant—until you realize that everything that matters, everything that means you don’t die, is based not only on which passport you possess, but also on a complex web of definitions of what constitutes that passport. In the new battles over citizenship, those definitions are constantly under attack.

From "The Siege on Citizenship," the first installment in the Walker Art Center’s new series Artist Op-Eds. Next up: Metahaven, Liz Deschenes, Liam Gillick, others.