Detail from a page of the 1979 issue of Art Police modified by Frank Gaard



This image, appearing on a page of a zine, sparked controversy when it was included in the 10th anniversary show of the Minnesota Artists’ Exhibition Program at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts. A moustache added to a photo of Duchamp was intended by Gaard as a playful homage to an artistic hero, but some thought it referenced Hitler and was therefore anti-Semitic. As Michael Fallon wrote in 2001, “Gaard was married to a Jewish woman, was taking classes to convert to Judaism, and had two sons being raised Jewish.” “It cut him deeply to be called anti-Semitic,” then-MAEP director Stewart Turnquist told Fallon.

From "Publishing a Decade: Neal Cuthbert on Artpaper and the ’80s”
Detail from a page of the 1979 issue of Art Police modified by Frank Gaard

This image, appearing on a page of a zine, sparked controversy when it was included in the 10th anniversary show of the Minnesota Artists’ Exhibition Program at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts. A moustache added to a photo of Duchamp was intended by Gaard as a playful homage to an artistic hero, but some thought it referenced Hitler and was therefore anti-Semitic. As Michael Fallon wrote in 2001, “Gaard was married to a Jewish woman, was taking classes to convert to Judaism, and had two sons being raised Jewish.” “It cut him deeply to be called anti-Semitic,” then-MAEP director Stewart Turnquist told Fallon.

From "Publishing a Decade: Neal Cuthbert on Artpaper and the ’80s”